Вопрос: Замены для оператора switch в Python?


Я хочу написать функцию в Python, которая возвращает разные фиксированные значения на основе значения входного индекса.

На других языках я бы использовал switchили case, но Python, похоже, не имеет switchзаявление. Каковы рекомендуемые решения Python в этом сценарии?


1402


источник


Ответы:


Вы можете использовать словарь:

def f(x):
    return {
        'a': 1,
        'b': 2,
    }[x]

1093



Если вы хотите по умолчанию использовать словарь get(key[, default])метод:

def f(x):
    return {
        'a': 1,
        'b': 2
    }.get(x, 9)    # 9 is default if x not found

1079



Мне всегда нравилось делать это так

result = {
  'a': lambda x: x * 5,
  'b': lambda x: x + 7,
  'c': lambda x: x - 2
}[value](x)

Отсюда


284



In addition to the dictionary methods (which I really like, BTW), you can also use if-elif-else to obtain the switch/case/default functionality:

if x == 'a':
    # Do the thing
elif x == 'b':
    # Do the other thing
if x in 'bc':
    # Fall-through by not using elif, but now the default case includes case 'a'!
elif x in 'xyz':
    # Do yet another thing
else:
    # Do the default

This of course is not identical to switch/case - you cannot have fall-through as easily as leaving off the break; statement, but you can have a more complicated test. Its formatting is nicer than a series of nested ifs, even though functionally that's what it is closer to.


237



My favorite Python recipe for switch/case is:

choices = {'a': 1, 'b': 2}
result = choices.get(key, 'default')

Short and simple for simple scenarios.

Compare to 11+ lines of C code:

// C Language version of a simple 'switch/case'.
switch( key ) 
{
    case 'a' :
        result = 1;
        break;
    case 'b' :
        result = 2;
        break;
    default :
        result = -1;
}

You can even assign multiple variables by using tuples:

choices = {'a': (1, 2, 3), 'b': (4, 5, 6)}
(result1, result2, result3) = choices.get(key, ('default1', 'default2', 'default3'))

115



class switch(object):
    value = None
    def __new__(class_, value):
        class_.value = value
        return True

def case(*args):
    return any((arg == switch.value for arg in args))

Usage:

while switch(n):
    if case(0):
        print "You typed zero."
        break
    if case(1, 4, 9):
        print "n is a perfect square."
        break
    if case(2):
        print "n is an even number."
    if case(2, 3, 5, 7):
        print "n is a prime number."
        break
    if case(6, 8):
        print "n is an even number."
        break
    print "Only single-digit numbers are allowed."
    break

Tests:

n = 2
#Result:
#n is an even number.
#n is a prime number.
n = 11
#Result:
#Only single-digit numbers are allowed.

84



There's a pattern that I learned from Twisted Python code.

class SMTP:
    def lookupMethod(self, command):
        return getattr(self, 'do_' + command.upper(), None)
    def do_HELO(self, rest):
        return 'Howdy ' + rest
    def do_QUIT(self, rest):
        return 'Bye'

SMTP().lookupMethod('HELO')('foo.bar.com') # => 'Howdy foo.bar.com'
SMTP().lookupMethod('QUIT')('') # => 'Bye'

You can use it any time you need to dispatch on a token and execute extended piece of code. In a state machine you would have state_ methods, and dispatch on self.state. This switch can be cleanly extended by inheriting from base class and defining your own do_ methods. Often times you won't even have do_ methods in the base class.

Edit: how exactly is that used

In case of SMTP you will receive HELO from the wire. The relevant code (from twisted/mail/smtp.py, modified for our case) looks like this

class SMTP:
    # ...

    def do_UNKNOWN(self, rest):
        raise NotImplementedError, 'received unknown command'

    def state_COMMAND(self, line):
        line = line.strip()
        parts = line.split(None, 1)
        if parts:
            method = self.lookupMethod(parts[0]) or self.do_UNKNOWN
            if len(parts) == 2:
                return method(parts[1])
            else:
                return method('')
        else:
            raise SyntaxError, 'bad syntax'

SMTP().state_COMMAND('   HELO   foo.bar.com  ') # => Howdy foo.bar.com

You'll receive ' HELO foo.bar.com ' (or you might get 'QUIT' or 'RCPT TO: foo'). This is tokenized into parts as ['HELO', 'foo.bar.com']. The actual method lookup name is taken from parts[0].

(The original method is also called state_COMMAND, because it uses the same pattern to implement a state machine, i.e. getattr(self, 'state_' + self.mode))


40



My favorite one is a really nice recipe. You'll really like it. It's the closest one I've seen to actual switch case statements, especially in features.

Here's an example:

# The following example is pretty much the exact use-case of a dictionary,
# but is included for its simplicity. Note that you can include statements
# in each suite.
v = 'ten'
for case in switch(v):
    if case('one'):
        print 1
        break
    if case('two'):
        print 2
        break
    if case('ten'):
        print 10
        break
    if case('eleven'):
        print 11
        break
    if case(): # default, could also just omit condition or 'if True'
        print "something else!"
        # No need to break here, it'll stop anyway

# break is used here to look as much like the real thing as possible, but
# elif is generally just as good and more concise.

# Empty suites are considered syntax errors, so intentional fall-throughs
# should contain 'pass'
c = 'z'
for case in switch(c):
    if case('a'): pass # only necessary if the rest of the suite is empty
    if case('b'): pass
    # ...
    if case('y'): pass
    if case('z'):
        print "c is lowercase!"
        break
    if case('A'): pass
    # ...
    if case('Z'):
        print "c is uppercase!"
        break
    if case(): # default
        print "I dunno what c was!"

# As suggested by Pierre Quentel, you can even expand upon the
# functionality of the classic 'case' statement by matching multiple
# cases in a single shot. This greatly benefits operations such as the
# uppercase/lowercase example above:
import string
c = 'A'
for case in switch(c):
    if case(*string.lowercase): # note the * for unpacking as arguments
        print "c is lowercase!"
        break
    if case(*string.uppercase):
        print "c is uppercase!"
        break
    if case('!', '?', '.'): # normal argument passing style also applies
        print "c is a sentence terminator!"
        break
    if case(): # default
        print "I dunno what c was!"

36



class Switch:
    def __init__(self, value): self._val = value
    def __enter__(self): return self
    def __exit__(self, type, value, traceback): return False # Allows traceback to occur
    def __call__(self, *mconds): return self._val in mconds

from datetime import datetime
with Switch(datetime.today().weekday()) as case:
    if case(0):
        # Basic usage of switch
        print("I hate mondays so much.")
        # Note there is no break needed here
    elif case(1,2):
        # This switch also supports multiple conditions (in one line)
        print("When is the weekend going to be here?")
    elif case(3,4): print("The weekend is near.")
    else:
        # Default would occur here
        print("Let's go have fun!") # Didn't use case for example purposes

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